1. Not old. Vintage. :)

800XL Memory Upgrade (options)

Memory upgrade options for the Atari 800XL


{Collected from a defunct Atari board}


best options are the plug n go options:

the current options are this
atariage.com/forums/topic/251315-sys-check-v22-ready-to-use-batch-available/?hl=%2Bsyscheck#entry3493001

and this
atariage.com/forums/topic/162420-ram-320xl/page-18?hl=ram+320xl#entry2190666

and this one is being worked on
atariage.com/forums/topic/249405-new-4mb-ram-expansion/

and - if you don't mind a bit of soldering
lotharek.pl/product.php?pid=67

cart option
www.atarimax.com/myide/documentation/

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There are two more options:

'AtariMax' 256/512K Rambo upgrade that is fully compatible with the Rambo standard and 'Bits of the Past' has a 256K only Rambo upgrade. Rambo works with 99.9% of extended memory programs and games. Almost everything that uses extended memory uses both the 130XE and Rambo memory standards, I've never had an issue. I know of two programs that require the XE standard; Video Blitz demo and a graphic art slide-show demo by Atari. Otherwise Rambo works with all other extended memory XE programs. This product is not advertised on AtariMax, you have to specifically ask for it via e-mail. This is the upgrade I installed in my 1200XL, at a full 512K (and am about to re-install in my new 1200 mobo). Of course this is also a full-on solder and replace the chips upgrade, requiring soldering skills and it is extensive. Bits of the Past still show a couple Rambo 256 upgrades in stock for $25. AtariMax's is a bit more, IIRC, but it can have a half meg of memory with it. I think ram chips are extra with both.

To put this memory equation into perspective, there are only one or two demos that use a full megabyte of memory, and I think The Last Word processor may be able to utilize up to a megabyte. Nothing uses more than 1 megabyte of memory that I know of, yet, unless there is some program or demo that will come with the 4MB upgrade. 98-99% of extended memory software is 320K or less, 95-97% of it is 256K or less. 90-94% requires a 128K machine only because there is no option between 64-128K. And these percentages are only among extended memory software, overall, 75% of software runs on 48K or less, and 23% requires 64K and 2% more than 64K. But that 2% is some very cool stuff that makes it all worth while! This is all a big guess on my part, from my experience, just within the ball-park figures.

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