1. Not old. Vintage. :)

DIY bound paper-back manuals

Discussion in 'SIG: General Chat' started by M.D.Baker, Mar 10, 2022.

  1. by M.D.Baker
    M.D.Baker

    M.D.Baker Chief Officer

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    I got tired of wasting paper and printing out PDF's the size of magazines and stapling them together for manuals I don't own or for stuff that never had a real manual, just text files or whatever.

    So when I downloaded the PDF for the Bally Arcade's Machine Language Manager cartridge and saw that it was 105 pages, way too thick to staple anyway, So I became determined to learn a new self-reliant do-it-yourself on-the-cheap Renaissance-man skill-set and make my own hand bound paper back manual. Of course the double-sided printing was just a few clicks on the printer set-up to have it print two pages to a side, 4 pages per paper sheet, collated to simply be cut in half with the left side placed as the bottom half of the stack. I'd just never tried before.

    Then I made a cover using a photo I took of the MLM's cartridge label and resized and printed it out on a sheet of label paper. I cut it out and stuck it to the center of a sheet of card stock paper for the cover, then I fit the cover over the paper pages, folded it over to make a front and back cover and creased it where the binding would be.

    Then I made sure everything was stack even by tapping the edge on the desktop. I then grabbed my favorite industrial strength silicone epoxy glue, E6000 and spread it along the book's spine and inside cover spine, place the cover over the pages and let it dry for about half an hour.

    Below is the result of my first ever home-made paper back book.

    20220309_233752.jpg 20220309_233802.jpg 20220309_233812.jpg 20220309_233825.jpg 20220310_000223.jpg
     
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  2. by Andy Barr
    Andy Barr

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    Great work, Matt - none of us are ever too old to learn a new trick / skill or two.

    You give the rest of us so much inspiration, mate.

    Keep up the great work.
     
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  3. by M.D.Baker
    M.D.Baker

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    Thanks Andy. I love your new avatar picture, you two look absolutely marvelous.
     
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  4. by nysavant
    nysavant

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    Bev is actually whispering "half your Oric collection is now mine love" into our Andy's ear :)
     
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  5. by AlexDrito
    AlexDrito

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    Nice work, Matt. The result is very clean and most of all handy and useful. The spine of the book with the title is a real gem. Indistinguishable from real books once it is upright on the shelf.
     
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  6. by Andy Barr
    Andy Barr

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    All I need to add is I second all those praises and congrats - truly great DIY once more, Matt. You inspire us guys - daily.
     
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  7. by M.D.Baker
    M.D.Baker

    M.D.Baker Chief Officer

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    Thanks guys. This was actually an idea I got from a very old childhood memory that just popped in my head while looking at the PDF of this manual. I use PDF's if I don't have, can't afford or can't find some of the rarer of these real manuals and books from the golden age of computing. But I really don't like to read books off a screen that I have to scroll through and can't bookmark or dog-ear book corners to return instantly.

    There are other reasons too, but it's not important, so back to the childhood memory. I don't know if any of you, outside of the U.S. or North America ever saw broadcasts of a children's show called 'Mr. Rogers Neighborhood,' but if you ever watched a more adult orient show 'How it's Made,' then you have an idea of what a segment of Mr.R's kids show covered. My memory took me back to an episode where he visited a book manufacturing/binding plant and they showed how it was done. With machines of course, but that is for mass production and uniformity. It can all be done by hand, like the first books hundreds of years ago were.

    Anyway, though I haven't had time with work and other projects, I intend to make several more for my other micros. I think my next will be 'De re Atari.' But I'm going to invest in one of those large paper cutters like I and maybe you all used in school at some point.

    Vintage-Burke-James-Ingento-No-1-Wooden.jpg

    So I can make the books of equal quality too mass-printed and bound books. 'Mapping the Atari' would have been the next, but luckily it's one of the dozen books that @Timothy Kline gave me a few years back, De re wasn't among them and of course several others I want, though some other good ones were.
     
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  8. by M.D.Baker
    M.D.Baker

    M.D.Baker Chief Officer

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    I decided to show this one here, instead of the new pussy cat thread since this is were I started talking about it.

    I ordered, and it arrive a couple of days ago. I was looking for a solid wood base one, but the steel one's were half the price. And now that I have it in my hands (untested as of yet-been too busy with other things) it nice and solid and will be perfect for my needs. It can handle 12 sheets at a time, but I'm sure I could "push the envelope" a bit and get 13 or 14 out of it.

    This is just the stock image, but it's exactly what I bought. This is actually another addition to my office trailer, though it will sit on a shelf to be pulled out until I get work benches built, then I'll mount it permanently to the bench with some bolts or something; I can remove it's rubber feet and use the holes for them to bolt too for mounting. the steel plate it's constructed with folds under all around for increased sturdiness and there are larger square areas at the corners where the rubber feet are mounted.

    The one possible issue I foresee is feeding the bolts through the top with a low clearance, but I can't have the nuts on top and reach under in anyway to tighten them down. So I may be forced to bend the corner "wings" enough to fit bolts through the hole that are at least an inch long, as the workbenches will be built using 3/4" plywood, the thickest any lumber yard or home improvement store has on hand around here.One of the work benches will be for mechanics and carpentry so there may be auto transmissions or engines it needs to hold (yes that's an exaggeration, but only because I couldn't get them up the steps through the door-but lawn mower engines yes) , and the other, of course will be for a larger electronics work bench for me alone. They will be even and flush, mated at the corner(s) of the trailer walls, so they still have to be flush, so it will still get the 3/4" plywood even though it's overkill for what's needed. Even 1/4" plywood would suffice for your average electronic instruments.



    BlackPCutSteel.jpg
     
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