1. Not old. Vintage. :)

Practical Club expansion...?

Discussion in 'SIG: General Chat' started by Timothy Kline, May 14, 2020.

?

Should the Club add a Programming SIG?

Poll closed May 21, 2020.
  1. Yes

    5 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. No

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. What's a SIG?

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. I'm just here for the popcorn.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. No preference. Don't care.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. by Timothy Kline
    Timothy Kline

    Timothy Kline Administrator Staff Member

    Blog Posts:
    3
    Articles:
    39
    I'm wondering if anyone would be interested in seeing a Programming SIG added for the Atari 8 as well as our 6502 siblings. Discussions would, presumably, revolve around programming— and can include any of the available programming languages.

    Thoughts?
     
    Andy Barr likes this.
  2. by Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine
    Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine

    Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine Deckhand

    Blog Posts:
    2
    Sure, maybe not all are a programmer at heart but its a valid group and certainly an interest for some.

    Does not have to be Atari / 6502 only. I used to write in 65C816 on the Super Nintendo, sure its only a 16bit 6502 but it was fun. Stopped coding a long time ago, realised I wasn't that good at it :) I was ok for a few utils and some cracking but my maths is rubbish. Things like rolled code etc are just words to me..
     
    Andy Barr likes this.
  3. by Andy Barr
    Andy Barr

    Andy Barr Deckhand

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Yeah,

    I would love to get back into coding a bit of junk on either my Oric, Atari 8bit or Beeb but it's funny how we all put our hands up and say we're rubbish.

    I really am a basic BASIC programmer but I do enjoy dabbling and I would lurve to add a bit of machine code knowledge before I finally kick my personal diodes.

    Good call, Tim.
     
    AlexDrito and Timothy Kline like this.
  4. by Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine
    Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine

    Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine Deckhand

    Blog Posts:
    2
    Never touched BASIC bar on the ZX80, I just got the want to learn assembler because if the games were written in that then it was the one to learn. Being a mathematics dunce didn't help but thankfully writing code to loads disks, menu's and the like didn't need too much maths. Sadly none of crap exists now bar my crack and modification of the game Sidewinder called Raid over Libya. On it I'm called Mole Eater which was a joke re Mike Morgan, the software part of the Computerhouse OS board, he was also known as The Mole and cracked loads of the EA titles back then.

    The problem is I didn't give my name much thought and only later did I see the wrong in it, you see Mike was a gay man, so there's me saying I'm eating him...Whoops.

    I'd love to find a menu system me and a guy called Steve co wrote, was a visual treat with ripped out sprites like the EA loader EA and all sorts, the only thing we were stuck on was initialising cartridge roms that seemed to load at $0....Otherwise it was all complete and worked really well, like a fancy multiboot. The thing is I lost track of Steve, could not find him and it didn't help his name was Steve Harley but it wasn't that Steve Harley...

    No idea where of if he's around...Found his ex wife many years ago and turned out he had met an older woman in his work place and cleared off not long after he had got married (which I attended)....Life is messed up sometimes..
     
    Andy Barr likes this.
  5. by Timothy Kline
    Timothy Kline

    Timothy Kline Administrator Staff Member

    Blog Posts:
    3
    Articles:
    39
    _________

    I've forgotten nearly everything from not keeping up any programming once I discovered BBSing. Sure, I remember some things, but I was still going between TurboBASIC and BASIC XE for its built-in banking functions that I had some curious ideas about utilizing. Machine Language intimidated me; still does, but at least I'm coming back to it with a fresh eye and an amazing library of 6502 programming that was never available to me back in the Way-back. Sure, I had the "big 3" Atari magazines, but Atari clubs were already on the wane by the time I'd discovered the Atari home computers and asked for membership fees which were way above my financial ability in those days. Compute!, ANALOG, and Antic. And every spiral-bound Compute! publication, including Mapping the Atari and Richard Mansfield's 2-volume Machine Language for Beginners. Written at a level that my thick skull can understand.

    I learned to program by typing in for hours the programs that were being published in those days. I tapped away, watching the program come together. And I soooooooo appreciated with checksums came to the mags. Especially ANALOG, with its eye-searing rows of numeric machine language code!

    Anyhow, I miss it— and I still have some unfulfilled concepts to demonstrate some of the coolness factor with the Atari 8-bit beyond games and demos (which rock these days, I'll be the first to say). I'm about the practical usage: productivity. I already know how to have fun with my Atari. I want to get it up on the highway and see it handle an office suite or financial software suite. GEOS and even Jon's GUI-based OS are great ways to experience a second-generation 8-bit OS, no question whatsoever— but I enjoy command prompts while at the same time having the ability to use a mouse as an alternative to the arrow-keys.

    The Norton Commander style approach to file management, the Desqview style approach to application management and, arguably, multi-tasking on the Atari (especially via VBIs, I think was where I was aiming). This isn't an environment where one would run a game in the background— this is where a person may very well be working in a word processor and FujiNet with its pre-reqs for online communication, and full access to the command prompt for programming. The fact that the OSS carts have been made available in a way that bypasses the long-time plugged cartridge slot gives me hope that it's possible to Desqview out actual cartridges, like DqVing between BASIC XE and Action!, as an example.

    A nice, high aim there, but in all honesty, I'll settle with building the Norton Commander/Desqview kernel ... and my dream PIA-based networking driver!!

    At the same time, like Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry said, "A man's gotta know his limitations."

    Really appreciating and enjoying the thoughts coming in!

    --Tim
     
    Andy Barr likes this.
  6. by Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine
    Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine

    Paul "Mclaneinc" Irvine Deckhand

    Blog Posts:
    2
    That's a line I use a lot on AA....

    As for returning to programming, I doubt it very much in my case, not because of lack in interest but simply because I can't sit in one position too long or my neck gets super painful...

    Makes trying to watch Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame blooming hard...(not completed either as yet although I do know how they end..
     

Share This Page